Dear Distinguished Subscribers,

Welcome to the 64th Edition of Stuffed. 

D’oh! It’s Friday which means it’s time for another edition of Stuffed. With just over a month until Christmas, our social calendars are filling up with lots of festive activities. Whilst some may groan and cry “it’s too soon!” for the twinkly intro of All I want for Christmas is you to start, this past week has seen London light up in celebration of the start of the festive season. And we have to say, after a year of lockdowns and canceled plans, it’s a joy to see, sorry Scrooge. 
 
We take a closer look at London’s West End co-ordinated light up, as well as Bart Simpson’s new role in fashion in this week’s Stuffed. 

If you haven’t already done so, you can subscribe to Stuffed here.

Happy reading and stay safe everyone.

From your friends at Goodstuff.

STUFFED WITH CULTURE

Feature creep across the big tech platforms is something we’ve written about before in Stuffed, as the desire to keep users in their own walled gardens leads to every platform offering pretty much the same thing: stories, followers, comments, a feed algorithm powered by likes. The latest development is Spotify’s announcement that they’re giving video another crack – but this time, they’re focusing on it as part of their podcasting strategy. It’s an interesting move, partly because their flagship Joe Rogan podcast first found success on YouTube, but also because it signals the growing importance of attracting and enabling creators to modern media platforms. Bloomberg has more. 

 It’s such a staple of our city streets, that it may be surprising to hear that the venerable Big Issue has just marked 30 years of supporting the UK’s homeless population – helping over 100,000 vendors raise £144 million. This milestone birthday is being marked by the debut of a complete redesign of the magazine – the bold new look has been led by famed New York Times designer, Matt Willey.  

 Want to be happier? Try joining a physically and mentally stimulating religious club with friends and family. And be nice. But if you’re a self-employed vegan – maybe it’s time to think again. After analysing a huge range of potential strategies, the world’s top happiness researchers have published a ranked list of the most, and least effective ways for an individual to feel happier. Some you’ll be familiar with, but there are a few surprises in there too. The full paper is here if you’re extra keen, or just read the ranked list here.   

 

 STUFFED WITH CREATIVITY

There’s nothing trivial about Hasbro’s Pizza pursuit

Hasbro and Pizza Hut have partnered to create a pizza box game of Trivial Pursuit. Families can play Pizza Pursuit by scanning the QR code for a chance to win up to £10,000 cash. Combining both the delicious taste of pizza and the fun of Trivial Pursuit for everyone.  

Amazon delivers an illusion in Prime out of home locations

To mark the launch of their new blockbuster drama ‘The Wheel of Time,’ Amazon has a series of anamorphic ads for flagship Ocean sites within London, New York, and Tokyo. Custom made for each location, the ads use DeepScreen technology launched earlier this year.  

Homer Simpson is Balenciaga’s next top model

In a casting move that would baffle most runway commentators, Balenciaga has teamed up with the makers of Simpsons to launch a 10-minute mini-branded episode. The film, first launched during Paris Fashion Week celebrates a Simpsons licensed collection produced by the luxury fashion brand.   

There isn’t an ordinary station takeover, it’s an M&S one

M&S have turned up the heat in the battle of the (retail) brands at Christmas with a station takeover at Waterloo, consisting of an experiential area, large format screens, and static advertising across the station. The takeover is part of their ‘Anything But Ordinary’ Christmas campaign.

STUFFED WITH COMMS

Christmas lights have been switched on across London’s West End in it’s first ever co-ordinated light-up

Last week, London Mayor Sadiq Khan attended London’s West End Christmas lights being switched on.  For the first time, the world-famous streets of Oxford Street, Regent Street, South Molton Street, Bond Street, Mayfair, Piccadilly Circus, St James, and Leicester Square, have united to collectively switch on their lights to officially mark the start of the festive season in the capital. 

Oxford Street usually unveils its Christmas lights first, but this year 20 streets across the West End, all lit up in sync last week for what was the biggest switch-on in the world. Between them using more than a million LEDs. The event was kept secret, with shoppers being surprised with a 10-second countdown on Ocean’s DOOH screen at Piccadilly Circus. It is part of a campaign to boost business in the run-up to Christmas. 

Sadiq Khan the Mayor of London, said: “London is the greatest city in the world and I’m thrilled that this year the West End is hosting the largest Christmas lights switch-on ever seen. 

 

The three essentials to the success of automated media buying

There is no doubt that the advertising industry faces a challenging environment due to structural weakness caused by the modern migration to digital platforms. This has created unprecedented factors which create their own set of extra costs and put pressures on efficiencies. Thus, new biz processes are being designed to not only improve efficiency but also be functional enough to stay in line with the volatility in market movements. Media management company Vidispine have vocalized the suggestion that automated media buying in linear TV could well be the key to coping with the ever-changing world of TV. According to Vidispine, automated television buying enables companies to have better agility and react faster whilst increasing competitiveness. They suggest three key elements that contribute to its success – Effective Automation, Optimization and Customer satisfaction. Although this doesn’t call for the end of human navigation (or agencies!) as it is still important to attribute ‘Automation with human touch’. 

Thanks for tuning in to the 64th edition of Stuffed, we’ll see you next week.